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Defining Disabling Injuries from a Personal Injury Perspective

Disability means many things depending on circumstances. Most people define it as the inability to move or function without assistance. A good example would be a serious spinal injury, where the victim is no longer able to move a significant part of the body or control involuntary functions. However, when it comes to personal injury, it does not have to be total or permanent to be disabling.

According to the website of the Hankey Law Office, people rely on their jobs to support their family. Disability in this case would mean no longer being able to perform their jobs the way they used to before the accident. If the victim works as a stevedore, for example, and sustained a back injury that precluded heavy lifting, this would be a disability. While the injury may heal over time, in the interim the victim loses income from being unable to work. If this will persist over 12 months based on a physician’s assessment, the victim should be entitled to disability benefits.

One could argue that the disability does not prevent the victim from engaging in less strenuous activities such as office work. However, the fact still remains that the injury prevented the victim from going back to work.

Disabling injuries are not always physical. In some instances, the victim is so traumatized by the incident that going back to work triggers incapacitating anxiety or fear. An example would be involvement in a serious car accident where the victim is no longer able to get into a vehicle without significant emotional or psychological distress. While the victim may not have physical incapacity, the mental disorder is still disabling. As a Louisville personal injury attorney will probably point out, if the horse will not go near the starting gate, the race will not start.

If you sustained disabling injuries because of the negligence or recklessness of a third party, financial compensation will not make it go away. However, you will be better able to adjust to your life-changing experience if you have the resources and time to heal. Consult with a personal or disabling injuries lawyer in your state for more information.

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